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US Vice President Joe Biden said on Tuesday there is no doubt that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government was responsible for the “heinous” use of chemical weapons on civilians in a deadly attack outside Damascus on August 21.
The groundwork for military intervention in Syria was laid out Tuesday by US Vice President Joe Biden, who for the first time said that Bashar al-Assad’s government was clearly responsible for the August 21 chemical weapons attack against civilians and that it must be held accountable for the “heinous” action.
Biden’s comments make him the highest-ranking US official to accuse the Syrian regime over the large-scale attack, which is thought to have killed hundreds.
“There is no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in Syria: the Syrian regime,” Biden said in a speech to the American Legion, a veterans’ group, in Houston.
“Those who use chemical weapons against defenceless men, women and children should and must be held accountable,” Biden said. He also said Assad has blocked UN investigators from the site and has been bombing it for days.The White House said on Tuesday that President Barack Obama had not yet decided how the United States would respond to the attack, which occurred in a suburb of Damascus that is held by rebels fighting to oust Assad. US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that American forces in the region were “ready to go” if Obama gave the order.
The British military was also drafting plans. Prime Minister David Cameron, who spoke to Obama on Tuesday for the second time in four days, recalled parliament for a debate on Syria on Thursday. Cameron said any strikes would be “specific” so as not to drag the allies deeper into Syria’s civil war.
France also moved to back the use of force in Syria on Tuesday and Australia, a close US ally and incoming chair of the United Nations Security Council, on Wednesday endorsed possible action against Syria even if the security council fails to agree.
The White House has promised to provide declassified evidence this week to prove that last week’s chemical attack was the work of regime forces.
Russia, Iran, China stand ground
The increasing likelihood of action within days was met with defiance in Damascus, with regime officials pledging to fight any attack with “surprise” measures, while Syrian allies Russia and Iran warned of dire consequences.
Both Russia and China accuse Western powers of using human rights complaints, such as in Libya, to meddle in sovereign states’ affairs. Russia, Assad’s main arms supplier, has opposes military action from the outset suggested this week that rebel forces may have released the poison gas.

China’s state news agency recalled on Tuesday how flawed intelligence was used to justify the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, while the People’s Daily, the official newspaper of the Communist Party, said the United States and its allies were seeking to use the issue to pursue regime change in Syria illegally.

Firm opposition from permanent members of the Security Council all but rules out a UN mandate of the kind that gave legal backing to NATO air strikes that helped Libyan rebels unseat Muammar Gaddafi two years ago.

“Our preference, everyone’s preference, would be for action, a response, under United Nations auspices,” Australian Foreign Minister Bob Carr, whose country takes over the rotating chair of the Security Council on Sunday, told reporters.

“But if that’s not possible, the sheer horror of a government using chemical weapons against its people, using chemical weapons in any circumstances, mandates a response.”
‘Ready to Punish’

In Britain, Cameron told reporters: “This is not about getting involved in a Middle Eastern war or changing our stance in Syria or going further into that conflict. It’s about chemical weapons. Their use is wrong and the world shouldn’t stand idly by.”

In France, which played a major role in Libya in 2011, President François Hollande said he was “ready to punish” Assad for using the chemical weapons, citing a 2005 UN provision for international action to protect civilians from their own governments.

Similar arguments were used by NATO to bomb Serbia, a Russian ally, in 1999 after the killing of civilians in Kosovo.The precise timing of possible military action remained unclear, but it is certain to wait for an official US intelligence report expected to blame Assad’s government for the chemical attack. The findings, considered merely a formality at this point, will be released this week, US officials said.
“The White House is now preparing public opinion which is still largely against US military intervention in Syria,” FRANCE 24’s Philip Crowther reported from Washington. “Any announcement we see from now on from Washington will come from the president himself, because everybody else has spoken,” he added.
Obama will go ahead with a speech on Wednesday at Washington’s Lincoln Memorial to mark the 50th anniversary of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic “I have a dream” speech.

Syrian state media accused rebels of using chemical arms against government troops in clashes Saturday near Damascus, while an international aid group said it has tallied 355 deaths from a purported chemical weapons attack earlier this week.

Doctors Without Borders said three hospitals it supports in the eastern Damascus region reported receiving roughly 3,600 patients with “neurotoxic symptoms” over less than three hours on Wednesday morning, when the attack in the eastern Ghouta area took place.

Of those, 355 died, said the Paris-based group.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Saturday that its estimated death toll from the alleged chemical attack reached 322, including 54 children, 82 women and dozens of fighters. It said the dead included 16 who have not been identified.

The Observatory’s earlier death toll was 136, saying it was raised after its activists in the stricken areas met doctors, residents and saw medical reports. It said the dead “fell in the massacre committed by the Syrian regime.”

Death tolls have varied over the alleged attack, with Syrian anti-government activists reporting between 322 and 1,300 being killed.

Meanwhile, U.S. naval forces are moving closer to Syria as President Barack Obama considers a military response to the alleged use of chemical weapons by President Bashar Assad’s government.

U.S. defense officials told The Associated Press that the Navy had sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into the eastern Mediterranean Sea but without immediate orders for any missile launch into Syria. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to discuss ship movements publicly.

Obama emphasized that a quick intervention in the Syrian civil war was problematic, given the international considerations that should precede a military strike. The White House said the president would meet Saturday with his national security team to consider possible next steps by the United States. Officials say once the facts are clear, Obama will make a decision about how to proceed.

With the pressure increasing, Syria’s state media accused rebels in the contested district of Jobar near Damascus of using chemical weapons against government troops Saturday.

State TV broadcast images of plastic jugs, gas masks, vials of an unspecified medication, explosives and other items that it said were seized from rebel hideouts Saturday. It did not, however, show any video of soldiers reportedly affected by toxic gas in the fighting.

The claims could muddy the debate about who was responsible for Wednesday’s alleged gas attack, which spurred demands for an independent investigation and renewed talk of potential international military action if chemical weapons were used.

Just hours before the state media reports, the U.N. disarmament chief arrived in Damascus to press Assad’s regime to allow U.N. experts to investigate the alleged attack. The regime has denied allegations that it was behind the Wednesday attack, calling them “absolutely baseless” and suggesting they are an attempt to discredit the government.

The U.S., Britain, France and Russia have urged the Assad regime and the rebels fighting to overthrow him to cooperate with the United Nations and allow a team of experts already in Syria to look into the latest purported use of chemical agents. The U.N. secretary-general dispatched Angela Kane, the high representative for disarmament affairs, to push for a speedy investigation into Wednesday’s purported attack. She did not speak to reporters upon her arrival in Damascus Saturday.

The state news agency said several government troops who took part in the Jobar offensive experienced severe trouble breathing or even “suffocation” after “armed terrorist groups used chemical weapons.” It was not clear what was meant by “suffocation,” and the report mentioned no fatalities among the troops.

“The Syrian Army achieved major progress in the past days and for that reason, the terrorist groups used chemical weapons as their last card,” state TV said. The government refers to rebels fighting to topple Assad as “terrorists.”

The report was followed by an unusual string of breaking alerts on the TV’s news scroll Saturday, with a series of claims related to the alleged use of chemical arms by rebels in Jobar.

One message cited a Syrian TV journalist embedded with the troops in the district who said the army confiscated an arms cache that included several barrels with “made in Saudi Arabia” stamped on them. It did not say what was in the barrels, but appeared to suggest that some sort of chemical agent was inside and supplied by Saudi Arabia, the region’s Sunni Muslim power and a staunch supporter of Syria’s Sunni-led revolt.

Another news scroll said that troops, after overrunning rebel positions, received antidotes following exposure to chemical agents. The TV said the medicines were produced by a Qatari-German medical supplies company. Qatar is another strong supporter of the Syrian rebels. The report could not be immediately verified.

State TV also broadcast images of a Syrian army officer, wearing a surgical mask, telling reporters wearing similar masks that soldiers were subjected to poisonous attack in Jobar. He spoke inside the depot where the alleged confiscated products were placed.

“Our troops did not suffer body wounds,” said the officer said. “I believe terrorist groups used special substances that are poisonous in an attempt to affect this advance.”

The Lebanon-based Al-Mayadeen TV, which has a reporter embedded with the troops in the area, said some 50 soldiers were rushed to Damascus hospitals for treatment and that it was not yet known what type of gas the troops were subjected to.

For days, the government has been trying to counter rebel allegations that the regime used chemical weapons on civilians in rebel-held areas of eastern Damascus, arguing that opposition fighters themselves were responsible for that attack.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius dismissed the Syrian government line.

“All the information we have is converging to indicate there was a chemical massacre in Syria, near Damascus, and that Bashar Assad’s regime was behind it,” Fabius told reporters during a visit to the West Bank city of Ramallah. He did not elaborate.

France has suggested that force could be used against Syria if Assad’s regime was proven to have used chemical arms.

The new talk of potential military action in Syria has made an independent investigation by U.N. inspectors critical to determine what exactly transpired.

The U.N. experts already in Syria are tasked with investigating three earlier purported chemical attacks in the country: one in the village of Khan al-Assal outside the northern city of Aleppo in March, as well as two other locations that have been kept secret for security reasons.

It took months of negotiations between the U.N. and Damascus before an agreement was struck to allow the 20-member team into Syria to investigate. Its mandate is limited to those three sites, however, and it is only charged with determining whether chemical weapons were used, not who used them.

Leaders of the main Western-backed Syrian opposition group on Saturday vowed retaliation for the alleged chemical weapons attack.

From Istanbul, the head of the Syrian National Coalition, Ahmad Al-Jarba, also criticized the lack of response to the attack by the United Nations and the international community, saying the UN was discrediting itself.

“It does not reach the ethical and legal response that Syrians expect,” he said. “As a matter of fact we can describe it as a shame.”

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